Natalie Robin

Natalie Robin

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What happens when the authorship of a production shifts away from the playwright or director to the designer? How do you create a show beginning with the space rather than an inquiry, prompt, or text? These are the kinds of questions that Philadelphia-based Pig Iron Theatre Company is asking in its most recent collaboration with MacArthur “Genius” set designer Mimi Lien: Superterranean, presented in this year’s Fringe Festival in Philadelphia.
Lighting designer Thomas “Church” Christmann, who began working with Korn in 2016, shares lighting plots for the band's 2019 The Nothing Tour, featuring a set designed by Christmann in collaboration with sound engineer Marko Vujovic, who has been working with Korn for 10 years now. The set includes a multitude of two-way mirrors attached to LED video tiles, so that when the video is turned off, all the mirror surfaces reflect lighting beams. The three dimensional effect from the movements of all these cubes and pods helps to create constantly new lighting scenes.
This season, Opera Australia broke new ground by presenting a completely “digital” season at the Sydney Opera House. The season included new productions of Madama Butterfly, Anna Bolena, and the world premiere of Whiteley. Lighting designer Damien Cooper lit Madama Butterfly. Cooper built on top of the traditional Opera Australia plot. Check out the list of lighting equipment and lighting plot below, and read about the full lighting design here.
Few recent cases of financial crime captured the public’s imagination as much as the swindling of Bernie Madoff. Deb Margolin’s Imagining Madoff revisits the monumental case through the eyes of Madoff himself; Galkin, a Jewish Holocaust survivor; and Madoff’s secretary. Originally written for Theater J in Washington, DC, the somewhat controversial play had its New York premiere this past spring at 59E59. Directed by Jerry Heymann, the production in New York relied heavily on the designers to transform a tiny theater into a space that could hold a play dealing with giant ideas. The play demands three distinct spaces (in three separate time periods) for the three characters to occupy simultaneously: Madoff’s cell, Galkin’s study, and the space for the unnamed secretary’s testimony in front of the Securities and Exchange Commission. But on the tiny stage at 59E59 that would prove to be an incredible challenge.
Few recent cases of financial crime captured the public’s imagination as much as the swindling of Bernie Madoff. Deb Margolin’s Imagining Madoff revisits the monumental case through the eyes of Madoff himself; Galkin, a Jewish Holocaust survivor; and Madoff’s secretary. Originally written for Theater J in Washington, DC, the somewhat controversial play had its New York premiere this past spring at 59E59. Directed by Jerry Heymann, the production in New York relied heavily on the designers to transform a tiny theater into a space that could hold a play dealing with giant ideas. The play demands three distinct spaces (in three separate time periods) for the three characters to occupy simultaneously: Madoff’s cell, Galkin’s study, and the space for the unnamed secretary’s testimony in front of the Securities and Exchange Commission. But on the tiny stage at 59E59 that would prove to be an incredible challenge.
For the 40th Anniversary season of Big Apple Circus, chairman Neil Kahanovitz brought together an incredible team of designers to infuse the circus with a new heightened design aesthetic. Directed by Mark Lonergan, the new production of the circus features production design by Rob Bissinger and Anita La Scala of ARDA Studio, with lighting design by Jeff Croiter. Check out the production design and costume design here.
For the 40th Anniversary season of Big Apple Circus, chairman Neil Kahanovitz brought together an incredible team of designers to infuse the circus with a new heightened design aesthetic. Directed by Mark Lonergan, the new production of the circus features production design by Rob Bissinger and Anita La Scala of ARDA Studio, with lighting design by Jeff Croiter. Check out the production design here.
Going to the circus is still filled with child-like wonderment. Perhaps because it is still filled with children. The Big Apple Circus, celebrating its 40th Anniversary season and its recent resurrection, is a single ring circus. There aren’t elephants or tigers, but there are horses and dogs and tremendous high wire acts. Following the financial demise of the not-for-profit which had been running the circus for years, a new commercial enterprise Big Top Works stepped in to bring the circus back to New York. Led by chairman Neil Kahanovitz, the new Big Apple Circus has brought together an incredible team of designers to infuse the circus with a new heightened design aesthetic.